I love “So Real” because it’s the actual quartet that you see in that picture right there that you have on the wall, on the album. And that one I produced live all one moment, the vocal is the first take, all one take. It was three o’clock in the morning.

(Jeff Buckley in Words: Interviews. “Grace under Fire,” by Toby Creswell. This interview was originally published in Juice Magazine, February 1996, Issue 36)

 

(“So Real” Recorded Bearsville Recording Studio, Woodstock, NY, Fall 1993)

newyorker
newyorker:

Richard Brody remembers the great record producer Alan Douglas, who died on Saturday at the age of eighty-one: http://nyr.kr/1l2c40s

“Douglas’s live recordings have a stark, harsh dryness that captures the intimate physicality of performance: the breath in the saxophone, the vibration of a reed, the drummer’s contact of wood on skins and metal rims, the plucking of a string bass and the resonations of its body. Until reading about Douglas now, after his death, I had never realized that he was responsible for these recordings, but their family resemblance in the tone of their musical voice is distinctive; it’s one of the sounds of the era.”

Alan Douglas (right) with Duke Ellington and Charles Mingus during the recording of the album “Money Jungle.” Photograph by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty.

newyorker:

Richard Brody remembers the great record producer Alan Douglas, who died on Saturday at the age of eighty-one: http://nyr.kr/1l2c40s

“Douglas’s live recordings have a stark, harsh dryness that captures the intimate physicality of performance: the breath in the saxophone, the vibration of a reed, the drummer’s contact of wood on skins and metal rims, the plucking of a string bass and the resonations of its body. Until reading about Douglas now, after his death, I had never realized that he was responsible for these recordings, but their family resemblance in the tone of their musical voice is distinctive; it’s one of the sounds of the era.”

Alan Douglas (right) with Duke Ellington and Charles Mingus during the recording of the album “Money Jungle.” Photograph by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty.

On “Haitian Fight Song”, Mingus said “[…] It has a folk spirit, the kind of folk music I’ve always heard anyway.[…] My solo in it it’s a deeply concentrated one. I can’t play it right unless I’m thinking about prejudice and persecution, and how unfair is it. There’s sadness and cries in it, but also determination. And it usually ends with my feeling ‘I told them! I hope somebody heard me!”